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StandAlone Feed Announces New and Improved Cattle Nutrition Supplement

New product line CHUBBY™ now available

 

8/18/17

 

ROTAN, TEXAS – StandAlone Feed released a new product line, CHUBBY™, for all classes of beef cattle. CHUBBY combines the reliability of the StandAlone brand of feed supplements with an improved formula for palatability, user experience and energy.

 

“I think CHUBBY will deliver the quality results our customers have come to expect, now with added benefits not seen in our other products,” says Jonathan Hjelmervik, president and owner of StandAlone.

 

StandAlone Feed, who  is committed to formulating supplements with more key nutrients at more effective levels, provides the same quality in CHUBBY, with more ease of use for customers. Additionally, the new formula combines 4 different sugars from the human-food industry, and Rice Bran Oil to provide an unmatched energy profile not found in livestock supplements today.

 

CHUBBY provides nutrients for optimal appetite, hair coat, joint and hoof health, and fat development. StandAlone’s unique blend of protein, fat, sugars, yeast, nucleotides and minerals are specifically calculated to help animals reach their full genetic potential.

 

Research suggests optimal nutrition and gut-health are keys to keeping an animal healthy and progressively gaining. With the addition of a properly-calculated feed supplement, like CHUBBY, cattle showman could see better results.

 

“I think it’s important to add a feed supplement,” Hjelmervik says. “It’s not about making a bad calf good, but helping all animals reach their full potential through an ideal balance of nutrition and health.”

 

Same as the original StandAlone supplement, CHUBBY can be applied to daily feedings. Stay tuned as CHUBBY for sheep and goats will be available this September, with a swine product to follow in the fall.

 

You can view a video of StandAlone president and owner, Jonathan Hjelmervik, speaking about the product, by clicking here.

 

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StandAlone Feed develops livestock nutritional feed supplements formulated with more key nutrients and at more effective levels than all the rest. StandAlone’s mission is to help livestock reach their full genetic protentional with optimal nutrition and health. StandAlone Feed is a privately owned company. For more information on this and other StandAlone products, please visit standalonefeed.com/ or call (855) 216.6705.

 

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7 Ways To Keep Your Stock Cool This Summer

 

Fall will be here before you know it, but some of the year’s hottest days remain. Use these tips to keep your animals cool and comfortable.

 

1. Shade

Shade

One of the most effective ways to beat the heat is to block the sun. Open-sided structures and trees both help cool a space without blocking the breeze.
 2. Fans

Fans

A well-placed fan (or several) will help stir up the air.

 

3. Misting Systems

Mister

A good mister can help cool the air by 15 degrees or more. Just be sure it’s putting out the optimum amount to cool the air without increasing the humidity.

 

4. Ice, ice baby

Ice

Toss some ice in a feed pan or on concrete flooring and let livestock chew on it.

 

5. A spray of the hose

Hose

But be careful to start at the feet and work up to prevent shock.

 

6. Working during the early and late hours

Night

Let animals rest during the heat of the day.

 

7. Cool and plentiful drinking water

water

You’ve heard it before: Animals (and people) can go a lot longer without food than water. And in the hot summer months, it becomes even more important. Keep the supply full and cool 24/7.

 

 

Tools For Success

By Brandon Horn

Breeding and raising quality cattle is simple math: you get out, what you put in. The most important input you have is time. You have to spend time working with them, observing them and learning their individual needs. Once you know their needs it is a simple process of using the tools at your disposal to compensate for their deficiencies and pushing them to reach their genetic potential. One of our tools for success is StandAlone Feed Supplements and we use it for a variety of reasons.

Once we find a calf that has the pieces we like it is now our responsibility to develop them into a quality show animal. Therefore, we use StandAlone to promote and stimulate good appetite. Most problems we encounter can be corrected with proper nutrition but it doesn’t matter what nutritional value your feed contains if they don’t eat it.

Now the fact that StandAlone promotes good appetite is not what makes it unique, it’s how it does it.  Unlike using oils and other products to put fat and condition on them this won’t raise their body temperature so they will eat and do well in the summer time. The nutrients found in this product are not only unique themselves but the levels they are mixed at gives us the right combination of muscle development and fat cover that we are looking for in our projects to succeed in the show ring.

The show ring, however, is a beauty contest. You have to have an outstanding animal, it has to be sound, it has to move well, but its presentation has to be right to set you apart from everyone else. StandAlone puts a special kind of shine to their coat we can’t find elsewhere. Their skin and hair are in top condition and we don’t see any type of dandruff or flakes. When all the other animals in the ring have a solid frame and optimal conditioning, it’s the little things that make you stand alone.

A Stock Show Mom’s Six C’s to Success

By a Lifelong Stock Show Mom

Spring time….my favorite time of the year, grass is turning green and spring babies are hitting the ground! With spring – most families undergo spring cleaning – but in our house spring means one thing – the major show season is behind us.

We undergo a different type of spring cleaning at our house. It is time for us to clean out our barn and start shopping for next year’s show animals. Picking out a show animal can be overwhelming, but it should be a fun, enjoyable learning experience. The first tip I would give anyone is to ask for help if you are uncomfortable picking out your animal. Ask your FFA advisor or 4-H agent – they are resources at your fingertips. Next, follow the Six C’s for Success:

1. CORRECT SELECTION
Select an animal not only with good conformation, but with a personality you can work with.

2. CONSISTENCY
There are no shortcuts to success. A consistent program encompassing regular workouts will accomplish more than a last minute flurry of activity two weeks before the show.

3. CALENDAR
Set calendar deadlines with ration changes, halter breaking, clipping and grooming, and practice shows. Maintain a regular daily schedule of feeding, handling and grooming your animal. Two weeks before the fair is not the time to start training your show animal.

4. COMPENSATION
Learn what your animal’s conformational strengths and weaknesses are so as to successfully emphasize the positive and downplay faults. Similarly, if the show animal has a personality flaw that will make showing difficult, plan ahead and compensate for this in the show ring.

5. CONFIDENCE
Show with confidence. Adequate preparation will allow you to show with a smile on your face. Be thoroughly familiar with rations, average daily gain, current weight, purchase weight, age, and breed of animal so you can answer questions from the judge. It is also important to be able to identify the different parts of the animal and the associated retail and whole sale cuts. You can help “psych” yourself up by rehearsing the show in your mind with good and bad things that could happen and how you would handle them. Performing in a practice show with members of your club or family acting as a judge and announcer and ring steward is helpful.

6. CHARACTER
Demonstrate impeccable ethics in the preparation preceding the show and during the show itself. Be courteous to all other exhibitors, parents and leaders. The livestock show is the culmination of the project year for many livestock participants and the community. Youth livestock exhibitors represent the livestock industry at fairs and shows to the public. A little courtesy (as well as a lot of honesty) goes a long way in relations with the public.


StandAlone Shines at San Antonio

By Jonathan Hjelmervik

 

StandAlone Feed had a great year. In 2014, we released four new products (Goat, Sheep, Swine and Swine High Fat) and focused on making StandAlone a success for any animal you choose to show. To me, nothing exemplifies 2014’s success more than the achievements of our customers at the 2015 San Antonio Stock Show.

 

Twenty-six StandAlone customers were recognized at the Breed/Division Champion level or higher across four species in both market and breeding shows. While cattle still dominate the champion list, the species using the new products are catching up quickly. Swine has only been on the market for 6 months and we are already seeing an impact at the highest level. I can’t wait to see what happens at upcoming shows.

 

Congratulations to all of our champions:

 

Jordan Schroeder-Edmiston – Grand Champion Market LambTyler Endicott – Grand Champion HogJagger Horn – Grand Champion SteerDawson Raub – Reserve Grand Champion SteerLillie Skiles – Reserve Supreme Champion FemaleKyle Ramsey – Champion Southdown Market LambIan Cobb – Reserve Champion Middle Weight goatLillie Skiles – Champion Shorthorn FemaleStewart Skiles – Reserve Champion Charolais FemaleAubree Blissard – Champion Simmental FemaleTate Villanueva – Champion Santa Gertrudis FemaleMyka Blissard – Reserve Champion Shorthorn FemaleKaty Smith – Champion Maine Anjou Steer Caitlyn Skiles – Champion Charolais SteerLillie Skiles – Champion Chianina SteerTreyton Clark – Champion Shorthorn SteerClay Cole – Champion Angus SteerTristan Himes – Champion Simmental SteerCade Waldrip - Champion Hereford SteerChase Waldrip – Champion Brangus SteerMason Koepp – Champion Simbrah SteerKaitlyn Kempen – Champion ABC SteerJaylee Gandy – Reserve Champion Limousin SteerHunter Cudd – Reserve Champion Shorthorn SteerStock Martin – Reserve Champion Charolais SteerJacob Fulgham – Reserve Champion Chester Gilt